UPDATED: To shred, or not to shred… / Khabi sentenced to minimum jail time/fine

By , August 31, 2010 9:52 am
Brilliant anti-drunk driving campaign photo

Brilliant anti-drunk driving campaign photo

So this topic has been pretty hot around the media lately. Jim Matheson has discussed it. Robin Brownlee has discussed it. David Staples has covered the story. John McKinnon did a couple write ups on the story. The Sun has done their share of stories on it. Various polls have been taken of fans on a few websites including OilersNation and HFBoards. The topic of course being, should the Oilers void Khabibulin’s contract?

The motivation here is simple. Take a horrible situation of Khabibulin speeding his Ferrari while 2x over the legal blood-alcohol limit and use it as reasoning to end Khabibulin’s brutal (I think most of us are in agreement of this) contract. Now, first off, I will say that I trust that there are several of you out there that are motivated to do this due to a personal hatred towards drunk drivers, perhaps due to a personal experience (losing a loved one, for example), and I can fully understand why you feel this way. And I’m not going to spew some bullshit like “it’s not like he killed someone!”. But my question after thinking about this, is why would we not turn this situation into more of a positive? If Khabibulin is struggling with alcohol issues (to me, a DUI is a sign of that), why not get him treatment he needs? Why would we not see where he goes with this, and ensure that he does the time within the community to speak about the dangers of drunk driving?

So far the poll results on websites have actually been kind of interesting (and I am proud that more Oil fans haven’t taken the “easy way out”). On HFBoards so far the votes are fairly even when it comes to whether the Oilers should take this opportunity to rip up Khabi’s contract. On OilersNation, 45% have said the Oilers should, while 33% say they shouldn’t, and 20% say that it depends on Khabibulin handles things. That leads me to believe that there is a pretty even mix of those that think he should be forgiven, with likely implication that the Oilers work with him to help turn things around, as there are those that are tired of Khabibulin on this team. It is just my own speculation, but I would think that most of those that voted to tear up Khabibulin’s contract would like it to happen based more on reasons outside of the extreme DUI/speeding offenses.

So what are your thoughts? Me, I’ve been on the fence of this. I really have a tough time justifying keeping Khabibulin around. His contract is probably the worst on this team.. too much money for too long a time for too problematic of a goaltender. However, I can’t let that thought get in the way of what is the right thing to do (see rant above). I’ll grudgingly support Khabibulin through this and hope that he can turn things around. It’s the twilight of his career, so I hope there is still motivation on his part. But if he’s motivated to do it, so will I be. So really, the ball is in his court. To use the Oilers Nation poll answer, my decision on whether to void the contract or not “depends on how he deals with it here on out.” The Oilers can’t completely hold his hand here. He needs to be the one that wants to rehabilitate (if necessary), and he needs to be the one that wants to speak to the community about the issue (even if with a small amount of prodding from the league, the Oilers, or the court).

So here is the poll question. I encourage everyone to vote on it. I also encourage you to vote HONESTLY. If you want it torn up, pick why you want it torn up (if the answer you want isn’t there, let me know in comments ;) ).

Would you like the Oilers to void Khabibulin's contract based on his charges?

View Results

Loading ... Loading ...

UPDATE: the trial started early as per #azsportsvibe on twitter (retweeted by Dan Tencer). Khabibulin has been sentenced to 30 days in jail with $507.60 base fine with surcharges, $500 DUI assessment and $500 DPS assessment, as well as alcohol treatment program. Court may suspend 20 of the 30 days if he completes counselling (which I presume means he’ll serve those in the off-season). So he might not even miss a lick of camp at all.

46 Responses to “UPDATED: To shred, or not to shred… / Khabi sentenced to minimum jail time/fine”

  1. Racki says:

    Redirecting Khabi talk for the day over here.

    Btw, his sentencing trial is slated to start at 4PM (MST) today.

    Also, I’ll add that my stance on this has wavered a little bit. I was once all about shredding Khabi’s contract because it’s absolute shit. But I realize (maybe due to some helpful reading) that this isn’t the way to go. As much as I want it to happen, it shouldn’t happen if Khabibulin is willing to take the proper strides to turn things around. And well, if he isn’t… then we can and should pursue the route of ripping that contract up.

  2. chucker says:

    I think I’ve been very clear on this. I think they should walk away, especially if the sentence is more than 30 days. I hate drunk driving. I’ve seen to much when I worked as an X-ray and MRI tech. We’d always be the first people to go to the crash room for these cases to get x-rays and scans of everything to see how badly injured people were. It’s a detestable crime.

    I’m very glad he did not hurt anyone, and perhaps it was one of those “fluke” situations, but I’m skeptical. I suppose if anyone has the potential to make any good out of it, it’s a pro athlete. By good I mean public education and rehabilitation if necessary. Unfortunately, the pattern of professional athletes going through the motions to appease the public has become equally detestable in my mind. I know I’m painting him with the same brush as other athletes who’ve basically done nothing and still play, but I’m really sick of the treatment these guys get.

    I’ll admit that if he comes back and plays well, that that is the best case for him personally, I just hope if it does come down to that, that he’s massively involved in community drunk driving programs and speaks to kids about how dumb he was and how lucky he would then be.

    The other thing is that there may be no choice for the Oilers here. If he gets more than 30 days, they have no choice but to void it now matter how they feel in my view. If he gets the 30 days based on first time offence and has conditions of community service and steps up and does more than that, then there may be a flicker of a chance at him redeeming himself.

    I admit, I hate the contract, but I liked the signing. I would be very convenient to rid ourselves of that contract, but if he played well and this issue didn’t come up, I wouldn’t be worried about it so much at this point. I think he was on the brink of a terrific season and I was looking forward to having him back in the pipes, but man, this is a huge deal to me. (his conviction).

    I guess if I’m being totally honest and try to practice what I believe in, then I would hope if it was me I’d get a second chance. He’s likely a great guy who can do more good than the average Joe who gets a DUI, so I’m hoping if he does get that chance, he runs with it and becomes an ambassador against drinking and driving. I still don’t like it, but we all f up massively once or twice in our lives, so maybe I’m be a bit of a hypocrite in slamming him so much, but it is a very emotional charge.

    I know I went all over the map therall over the map there, but I’m struggling with all the possible outcomes and what is the morally right and ethically proper thing to do here. I find it difficult because of my personal experiences, but at the end of it all, we’ll all just have to wait and see, and then re-adjust depending on what transpires.

    Sorry for the long ramble.

  3. RyanB says:

    Khabibulin is going to spend time in jail and I’m going to bet in the NHL’s substance abuse program too. Those will likely be meetings with a substance abuse counselor and won’t affect his ability/availability to play for the Oilers. To add voiding the contract into the mix is over the top in my opinion. If he voids his probation or does anything like this again then all bets are off but I think he deserves a second chance. I would hope to be given a second chance if I made a mistake like this so I have to give him a second chance too.

    If this was a player with a contract we all loved nobody would be looking to void the contract. Yes it’s a bad contract and it’d be great to get out of it but using this (for which he will be punished) as the way to do it just looks vindictive and petty.

  4. mrgod2u says:

    Rip it up.

    Reasons why:
    1) Drinking and driving is morally reprehensible and counter to the image that our team should have. In no way is it the kind of behavior that parents of little Oiler fans want their children emulating, and players ARE role models.

    2) It is a bad contract, heck it is a terrible contract, and hockey is a business first and foremost. So if we have an out on a contract that may handcuff us for years to come (and potentially tie up cap room when we are going to be a playoff team) we must act on it.

    3) The argument of “sticking up for our own” might hold more water if Khabi had more seasons/games as an Oiler. He was between the pipes for 18 games. We have career AHL’ers that have more games in an Oiler jersey. Seriously folks.

    4) The only real harm to our team might be to our image to free agents… Well, like anything else with the Oil.. this is already in the cellar so what difference would that make.

    5) I would believe as much of his “remorse” as I would believe that driving a speeding Ferrari drunk in Arizona is part of a recovery plan for back issues. As with EVERY freaking celeb case they are only really ever sorry that they were caught. Plus the consequences for him should be the same as for me, we both work contracts, if I was in jail and couldn’t be at my contracted work, I would be fired, plain and simple, and I would deserve it.

    6) the argument that the NHLPA would scream bloody murder, well that is a fair risk, but they also have an image to uphold, and they should be taken to task for defending a drunk driver. Let MADD run a commercial or two about that, see how they like being a heel too.

    The only plus I see to keeping him on the team is the off-chance that he gets all crazy prison bulked up in “the joint” and shanks Kipper mid-game at the first BoA this season.

  5. deratman says:

    If Khabibulin’s sentencing is such that it is made difficult for him to travel after his jail time is complete, maybe it could be in everybody’s best interests for Khabi the Oiler’s and NHL to sit down and agree to have the contract voided. Khabibulin could then move on and sign a deal in the KHL. Obviously he would have to take a big pay cut, but maybe avoiding restrictive parole conditions and further scrutiny around the league would be worth it to him. If he was in agreement then it wouldn’t be as much of an issue with the NHLPA, the Oil would be rid of a bad contract, and maybe Khabi would have less stress in his life. Would he be willing to take the pay cut? Probably not,but one can always hope.

  6. gr8one says:

    For the record, Just because I don’t think the Oilers will walk away doesn’t mean I don’t think they should.

    I take drunk driving VERY serious, for some very personal and good reason.(Wifes mother killed by one, we both work for MADD, I’m also on committee that has been allocated tens of thousands of dollars to help fight this massive issue in my region).

    But my desire for that to happen doesn’t change the reality, which at least in my mind the Oilers just don’t have a solid enough case to do it. Now if there are other issues involved that aren’t apparent yet, like his back is screwed up worse than is being reported and due to his legal and personal issues he hasn’t done his due diligence to be in shape for the season, then the Oilers might be on to something.

  7. Racki says:

    Chucker: that is great stuff, and exactly why I was asking the question. I know your stance on it based on asking the question earlier. I know that you have some moral reasons that make you want to have that contract torn up. And I understand that it’s a bit of a tough judgement to make whether to rip it up because you are angered at him being stupid to DUI, or you want him to get another chance and make amends through helping the community and cleaning his act up. I feel the same way.

    Also something that is brought up often is Craig MacTavish.. he’s an example of turning a big negative into a positive. The situations are a little different, but similar in ways (they certainly could have had the same outcome). If Khabibulin can take the same path as our boy MacT, then maybe it will be well worth giving him another chance

    RyanB: hard to argue with any of your argument here. I think this is what a lot of the MSM (mainstream media) are saying too.

    mrgod2u: I can understand where you’re coming from, but should he not get a chance to prove that he isn’t just treating this lightly? Shouldn’t he get a chance to prove he’s remorseful?

    Deratman: Welcome to the foil, first off. Secondly… you raise a really good point that I hadn’t thought of. Maybe it would be a mutual wish for Khabibulin to rip up the contract. Hell, for all we know, the reason’s he’s ripping around drunk are because he can’t handle the stress of not living up to the contract. Maybe, maybe not. But I suppose it’s a possibility that Khabibulin wants out of the contract (well, more so the stress) too.

    gr8one: thanks for that. Good to hear a member of MADD speak out on the subject too.

  8. Sheldon Oilers Fan for Life!!! says:

    I too have been all over the place I hate the contract but I hate drunk drivers more and I hate people in the public eye who get away with it the most. BUT I believe in grace and second chances so I guess in a perfect world I would have Habbi Apologize and work for MADD for the rest of his life because he sees the light. Then he cleans up his act Joins AA as a national spokesperson and has a great remainder to his contract and mentors the young goalies to stardom. Realistically these kind of people only see the light when they hit bottom. I hope the bottom is a Phoenix tent in the middle of cactus land and that Habbi has a epiphany. If not well it will only get worse and the Oilers will one day end up cutting him loose. In other words Habbi is really going to decide how this all turns out no matter what we all think.

  9. Racki says:

    Well, on a good note SOF4L, Khabi won’t get away with it. He committed the offense in the wrong state.. or the right state, perhaps. They’ll give him the rightful punishment. Plus it is expected that he’ll get a suspension from the league and/or the Oilers. He’ll also be remembered in the tail end of his career for this black mark, I’m sure. But I think in the end he could do himself and others a favor by taking ownership of it and doing the community service.

  10. mrgod2u says:

    There are crimes that carry consequences whether you are remorseful or not and whether it is your first time or not.

    I’m sorry but I think we need the money in that contract and a sober reliable uninjured netminder more than we need a local spokesbear for “I got caught drinking and driving and I’m sorry.”

    As for his remorse and a second chance, too damn bad. You get paid millions of dollars to play the game you have loved your whole life, but can’t keep your $hit together enough to not kill the goose that lays the golden egg.

    Nope, no sympathy here.

  11. Racki says:

    Sentencing started early and is done, per AZSPORTSVIBE twitter (Dan Tencer retweeted):

    30 day sentence, minimum fine, and treatment.

    Prepare for the outrage…

  12. chucker says:

    Racki: Sentencing started early and is done, per AZSPORTSVIBE twitter (Dan Tencer retweeted):30 day sentence, minimum fine, and treatment.Prepare for the outrage…

    Well, first time offence, so really not terribly surprised by it. Now for the circus…

  13. Racki says:

    Oh and one more important thing I missed…

    The court may suspend 20 of the 30 days if he completes counselling (which I presume means he’ll serve those in the off-season). So he might not even miss a lick of camp at all.

  14. LateNightOilFan says:

    Here’s another link.

    http://edmonton.ctv.ca/servlet/an/local/CTVNews/20100831/edm_trial_100831/20100831/?hub=EdmontonHome

    Over on HF they’re saying 20 of the 30 days can be completed at another time, but no link for that so far.

    Onto whether there is an Oilers/NHL suspension…

  15. Racki says:

    Oh my. Report is khabi will appeal. I’m sure that’s standard, but still disappointing. Take ownership 35

  16. Racki says:

    Bulins attorney: Bulin is free to leave the state and country. Will report to Oilers training camp.

  17. chucker says:

    Racki: Oh my. Report is khabi will appeal. I’m sure that’s standard, but still disappointing. Take ownership 35

    Well, it’s not surprising especially given the presentation of their “evidence” and re-tests. (Khabbi’s lawyer’s/experts testimony)

  18. victoriaoilerfan says:

    As I have posted before my nephew is a lawyer and lives in Scotsdale. I talked to him when all this started and he stated that is is very unlikely that Khabby will ever got to jail for even a day. He must first agree to treatment (which my nephew says is totaly B.S.)so he gets a very minimal sentence. Then if he appeals the ruling it will tie up the system in so much time and red tape they surely drop the charges on appeal as long as it is misdamenour offence and no one was killed or injured. It’s to expensive for the State to fight.
    Nephew’s take on A.Z. law is it all tough talk but no money in the system to give it teeth.
    Seems he knows what he is talking about

  19. MetalOil says:

    Racki: Oh my. Report is khabi will appeal. I’m sure that’s standard, but still disappointing. Take ownership 35

    Yeah this goes against that “He needs to be the one that wants to rehabilitate (if necessary), and he needs to be the one that wants to speak to the community about the issue”. He should accept the decision that was handed down today and get this over with so he can focus on hockey. This does not need to be dragged out any further.

  20. Racki says:

    MetalOil:
    Yeah this goes against that “He needs to be the one that wants to rehabilitate (if necessary), and he needs to be the one that wants to speak to the community about the issue”. He should accept the decision that was handed down today and get this over with so he can focus on hockey. This does not need to be dragged out any further.

    Yeah, can’t say I’m impressed by his lack of willingness to take ownership of it. My stance sways yet again… :P

  21. victoriaoilerfan says:

    Racki: Yeah, can’t say I’m impressed by his lack of willingness to take ownership of it. My stance sways yet again…

    He doesn’t want this record to stick. And..neither would we. So appeal and see if you can get out of it. Look if he comes to Edmonton and says sorry everyone what I did was dumb whats the difference?

  22. MetalOil says:

    I wonder if the appeal is too delay some sort of move the Oilers were contemplating? It would probably bye him a year and that 3.6 million dollar salary.

  23. Racki says:

    victoriaoilerfan: He doesn’t want this record to stick. And..neither would we. So appeal and see if you can get out of it. Look if he comes to Edmonton and says sorry everyone what I did was dumb whats the difference?

    Well it depends on what the follow up in Edmonton would be. If it’s just “sorry, what I did was dumb”, he can save his apology. I don’t need to see the guy go to jail or anything, but he better be making it up in community service time.. perhaps some donations to various alcohol awareness organizations. But a simple “sorry” isn’t going to cut it.

    Jason Gregor tweeted that his lawyer says that border travel is not an issue in this case.. if that’s true, then the record sticking isn’t really an issue for us as far as I’m concerned.

  24. MetalOil says:

    They just said on global news that since he now has a criminal record that he now needs to get a special permit to enter Canada. It is by no means automatic so contrary to what his lawyer is saying he IS NOT free to enter the Country.

  25. Racki says:

    Not surprised to hear that at all. Just relaying what the lawyer said (and I am thinking due to info below that he just meant no issue with travel while during appeal process). Btw, this permit has been mentioned here.. apparently it can take anywhere between 2 weeks to half a year to process (huh?? can that be right?) and also needs to be re-applied for every 6 months.

    More twitter info (twitter is abuzz with Oilers related news today):

    Jeff Marek: Oilers GM Steve Tambellini say’s Khabibulin will enter the NHL/PA substance abuse program.

    dantencer
    My understanding is that the ability of the judge to reduce sentence to 10 days is a provision that is no longer in use in AZ… I get a different answer every time I ask someone. Trying to confirm this.

    More Tencer: Oilers do not anticipate any travel issues while in appeals process… Tamby says they support him but are treating the matter very seriously internally…he doesn’t believe alcohol is a regular issue with Nik. No comment when asked about possibility of voiding the contract…says Nik will be admitted to NHLPA treatment program…

    azvibesports
    Bulins Attorney: Haven’t said what they are going to appeal. Just filed notice that they are planning to appeal.

    azc_mclellan
    According to Khabibulin’s lawyer, Khabibulin has been taking alcohol counseling since incident

    NHL_Oilers
    Tambellini says that there is a possibility of Souray coming to camp.

    Tambellini is also expecting Khabibulin to appear at camp.

  26. Hockey Noob says:

    Hey Racki,

    I have to concede that the horrendous contract clouds my judgement to an extent though it is a serious offensive to consider.

    On the one hand, I’m all for giving people a second chance, but at the same time there’s certainly the element of a ‘double standard’ for professional athletes.

    Who here could meet with their boss tomorrow and tell them that they’re going to spend 10-30 days in a tent in Arizona for a DUI conviction and still be employed at day’s end?

  27. Racki says:

    Hey Noob, good to see you around the Oilogosphere these days ;)

    That is a valid point. I’m pretty sure if I asked my boss to wait for me while I was in jail, I’d get shit canned.

  28. Racki says:

    More tweetery from azc_mclellan:

    NHLPA alcohol program may count as alcohol program subscribed in sentencing. But everything put on hold with appeal

  29. Racki says:

    If shat is the past tense of “to shit”, is twat the past tence of tweet? Just asking… I’m trying to learn this internets lingo.

  30. victoriaoilerfan says:

    MetalOil: They just said on global news that since he now has a criminal record that he now needs to get a special permit to enter Canada. It is by no means automatic so contrary to what his lawyer is saying he IS NOT free to enter the Country.

    Thus the appeal. If he appeals he can travel and likely the substance abuse counseling, communtiy service etc. a deal can be worked out.
    A.Z. will not fight all this. What is in it for them? The very worst is he gets 30 days and the fine, which is all a pitance and more of an annoyance to A.Z. than anything else.
    Please keep in mind this is a State with NO MONEY and a crime/immigtation issue they are fighting like hell.
    What happened in the courts with Khabby in A.Z. is history now as far as A.Z. is concerned. What he has to do is come back and work with the community in Edmonton and the OIlers at getting this thing worked out. But he has to make it clear what he did was terrible and dangerous.

  31. Racki says:

    I still would like to see him partake in some sort of public speeches in which he speaks to the public about the perils of his actions.. a la MADD, for example. It’s one thing to fix himself by attending the NHLPA’s substance abuse program, but if he wants to rebuild his reputation for the city (hint, morals clause), he can do so through community service such as that.

  32. victoriaoilerfan says:

    Racki: I still would like to see him partake in some sort of public speeches in which he speaks to the public about the perils of his actions.. a la MADD, for example. It’s one thing to fix himself by attending the NHLPA’s substance abuse program, but if he wants to rebuild his reputation for the city (hint, morals clause), he can do so through community service such as that.

    And you can bet that is what the Oilers have planned for him as we speak. So Khabby is back, for better or for worse. The Oilers will of course honour his contract and move forward.
    How the community reacts is very much in the hands of Khabby and to some extend the Oilers at this point.

  33. victoriaoilerfan says:

    Hockey Noob: Hey Racki,I have to concede that the horrendous contract clouds my judgement to an extent though it is a serious offensive to consider.On the one hand, I’m all for giving people a second chance, but at the same time there’s certainly the element of a ‘double standard’ for professional athletes.Who here could meet with their boss tomorrow and tell them that they’re going to spend 10-30 days in a tent in Arizona for a DUI conviction and still be employed at day’s end?

    Very few would be employed after this incident. But Khabby has a fat contract that is very hard to get out of remember. Look, many people wiht the backing of big unions have gotten away with worse. We have a teachers union out here in B.C. that have protect pedophiles in the classrooms.
    So Khabby’s outcome isn’t all the surprising.

  34. gr8one says:

    wow…watch this…

    http://oilers.nhl.tv/team/console.jsp?catid=4&id=74877

    is it just me, or does Tambi look/sound PISSED OFF?

  35. Mr.Majestyk says:

    I guess I missed all the drama today.

  36. chucker says:

    And so it drags on. Gaaaaawd. I just want a resolution of everything. Image how the Oilers and Khabbi feel?

    As for the “Would I be able to take a little break in the clink?” question to my boss, I would be stripped of all my licenses and out of work and have to retrain. That’s the world WE live in, pro sports is another world.

    @ Racki, I think the correct past tence is twatted. ;)

  37. Mr.Majestyk says:

    It actually depends on the job. If you are a truck driver then obviously getting charged with DUI is a really bad thing. In most cases the court will try and work things so that a person can keep their job. I mean, the punishment is 30 days in jail, not 30 days in jail plus you lose your income, and house because you couldn’t pay your mortgage because you lost your job.

    From my perspective what he did was wrong, nobody is going to argue otherwise, but the punishment that fits his crime seems to be so far off the map, not according to the court, but according to what fans think he should get. Fortunately in his case nobody was hurt.

  38. chucker says:

    Mr.Majestyk: It actually depends on the job. If you are a truck driver then obviously getting charged with DUI is a really bad thing. In most cases the court will try and work things so that a person can keep their job. I mean, the punishment is 30 days in jail, not 30 days in jail plus you lose your income, and house because you couldn’t pay your mortgage because you lost your job.From my perspective what he did was wrong, nobody is going to argue otherwise, but the punishment that fits his crime seems to be so far off the map, not according to the court, but according to what fans think he should get. Fortunately in his case nobody was hurt.

    I agree that courts will try to accomidate as best they can, but I know a lot of professions, including mine and my former profession, don’t. Every career job I’ve had I’ve had to get a criminal records check for and annually sign a legal document that this status has not changed. If I had lied about that, all my designations and my job would be revoked. Black and white in my profession and former profession. Maybe some others it can go by without to much issue, but I would suspect it’s pretty rare. If not, then you have a hell of an employer that really is great to their employees. Professional associations tend to be very strict, at least the ones I’m part of and have been part of.

    I’m not downplaying the fact that you’re likely right for many professions, but I know for many others it’s not an option to have any criminal convictions.

  39. LateNightOilFan says:

    chucker: I agree that courts will try to accomidate as best they can, but I know a lot of professions, including mine and my former profession, don’t. Every career job I’ve had I’ve had to get a criminal records check for and annually sign a legal document that this status has not changed. If I had lied about that, all my designations and my job would be revoked. Black and white in my profession and former profession. Maybe some others it can go by without to much issue, but I would suspect it’s pretty rare. If not, then you have a hell of an employer that really is great to their employees. Professional associations tend to be very strict, at least the ones I’m part of and have been part of.I’m not downplaying the fact that you’re likely right for many professions, but I know for many others it’s not an option to have any criminal convictions.

    Pretty much the same in my case, as I posted a few days ago. Also, it’s extremely difficult to get a job when you have a criminal record – makes sense that it would be difficult to keep a job when you have a criminal record.

    Finally got home and was able to watch Tambi’s interview – I agree with gr8one, he does look pissed. Khabi better be able to focus on hockey in the meantime, he owes this organization more than the average contracted player now.

  40. Racki says:

    I think it’s a combination of frustration and pissed.

    Kind of a “hey, it is your choice to be able to appeal, but thanks a lot for leaving us in limbo!”

    I’m sure he just wants some closure there, himself to know where the team will stand. Much like Souray.

  41. gr8one says:

    The other thing that jumped out at me watching that video was that by Tambellini’s reaction, him and the Oilers clearly had no idea Khabi and his dream team were appealing.

    Now, I’m not sure if it means anything or not, but you’d think when you’re employed with a multi-year, multi-million dollar contract, and you’re services to your employer have potential to have major impacts on your employers product…you’d think that said employer would be privy to such information, no?

    Also, what Tambi says about “it doesn’t allow me unfortunately to comment on behalf of the team on what we THOUGHT we’d be able to do”…

    Now, excuse me while I put on my Oilers tin foil hat…but if the team was going to stand behind Khabi regardless and come out with a show of support for him, why would an appeal putting it all off change what the Oilers were going to do/say??

  42. Racki says:

    gr8one: The other thing that jumped out at me watching that video was that by Tambellini’s reaction, him and the Oilers clearly had no idea Khabi and his dream team were appealing.Now, I’m not sure if it means anything or not, but you’d think when you’re employed with a multi-year, multi-million dollar contract, and you’re services to your employer have potential to have major impacts on your employers product…you’d think that said employer would be privy to such information, no?Also, what Tambi says about “it doesn’t allow me unfortunately to comment on behalf of the team on what we THOUGHT we’d be able to do”…Now, excuse me while I put on my Oilers tin foil hat…but if the team was going to stand behind Khabi regardless and come out with a show of support for him, why would an appeal putting it all off change what the Oilers were going to do/say??

    That statement definitely is open for a lot of interpretation…

    But the way I took the sentiment behind Tambi’s words were that he knew better where his goaltending situation stood when Khabi was getting 30 days in jail. He could say “OK.. I don’t have Khabi for this entire month, but he’ll be available for game 1.. and maybe I’ll need to send him to OKC briefly for conditioning, and we’re OK.”

    Now, however, he’s in complete limbo. He could have Khabi for training camp. The appeal could happen September 25th (just to throw a random date out there) and they could deny the appeal, and now he’s gone for most of October. The appeal could happen in December, and he could have Khabi for the months of October and November, and then lose him again in December/January if the appeal is denied.

    Really, all Khabi and his lawyer did was put a lot of uncertainty in this and fuck over the Oilers organization. Like Vic stated, it’s likely he’ll get off scot free now, but the Oilers don’t know this. They really don’t have any idea what months of this season they’ll have Khabi for.

    I’m sure Tambellini wanted some closure, and he probably thought he had that when the decision was laid down. But now he doesn’t.

    On top of that, he also will be doling out a suspension (and if not, the league likely will), so he’s got to plan for that too.

  43. gr8one says:

    ahh, yeah…good points.

    See, I was thinking of it from the angle that, in all reality…the appeal process will likely take AT LEAST the length of the season, nad some are speculating that it was appealed not to actually take it that far, but to push it back until next summer so that as soon as the Oilers season ends they retract the appeal and Khabi goes and does his time.

    In other words, it’s just a stall tactic to ensure that he is not in jail for any of TC or the season.

    But yeah, thinking about now, and especially the timing of Tambi’s comments being so soon after the outcome yesterday, what you say does make sense.

    *puts away tinfoil hat* lol

  44. MetalOil says:

    Anyone else find it interesting that news of Niemi being on the verge of signing with the Sharks comes the day after all of this? Maybe the Oilers were in talks with him but had to pull out due to Khabby’s appeal prolonging this situation thus delaying a possible contract voiding.

  45. Racki says:

    Hmm, that could be a coincidence, but pretty interesting thought though..

  46. MetalOil says:

    Yeah I am not gonna assume this although the timing of it does not rule out the possibility.

Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Panorama Theme by Themocracy

%d bloggers like this: